Wednesday, 25 July 2007

g-p-m/g-p-m integration

Richard sent me that little screenshot, showing off the gnome-phone-manager/gnome-power-manager integration, now in SVN of everything.


Yay! Integration! D-Bus! Buzzwords!

Hope I'm not stealing your thunder, but for once, you showed up on IRC after I did :)

12 comments:

Ross said...

But doesn't having a bluetooth connection open like that all of the time eat battery power? :)

Thomas Perl said...

I was astonished by gnome-power-manager reading the battery level of my wireless mouse, this seems even cooler. Sometimes in the future, I'll click on the notification area icon and see the power status of all my devices :) What about rendezvous/avahi integration for networked laptops? (e.g. sitting in the living room, looking up the battery level of the laptop sitting in another room ;)

hadess said...

Ross, yes it does, but we'll try to throttle so that it doesn't eat _all_ the battery. Even so, I can be connected for multiple days with my old Nokia 6230i without needing recharging. I know that Sony Ericssons and Motorola leak battery like an OAP when using Bluetooth.

Thomas, you're on crack, thanks :)

Richard Hughes said...

Thunder: stolen. :-)

Well, I finished at 2:30am, so I figured I could get up late...

Daniel said...

That is so wonderfully pimp. Unfortunately the S60 phones utterly destroy their batteries with Bluetooth; I think my record is two hours from full to empty.

Anonymous said...

This sort of stuff would be nice when I am recharging my Sony Erikssån using USB connection.. Yes, it came with a cable for that & data connection automatically.. And yes, it can recharge from USB, although it's slow (you remember the first cell phones from 90s? like 12 hour recharge times? It's almost that slow...)

Danilo said...

Will it work with my phone? Ugh, never mind that.

Anyway, Motorola A1200, a Linux-based device didn't had the battery last 3-4 days with moderate usage (whatever that might be) and bluetooth turned on.

Danilo said...

Scratch the "didn't" in there.

Adam Williamson said...

How is this actually useful? What's the use case for having the battery level of my cellphone - non-obviously - on my desktop? Bluetooth connections, practically speaking, are not long distance enough for this to let me check my cellphone's battery in any situation where it's out of arm's reach. And as everyone else said, Bluetooth eats battery power like candy on most phones. This seems very pointless.

hadess said...

Adam, it can also tell you when the phone is low on battery, which is even more interesting. If your phone sucks at keeping battery usage low when using Bluetooth, then it's hardly my fault...

Anonymous said...

"How is this actually useful? What's the use case for having the battery level of my cellphone - non-obviously - on my desktop? Bluetooth connections, practically speaking, are not long distance enough for this to let me check my cellphone's battery in any situation where it's out of arm's reach. And as everyone else said, Bluetooth eats battery power like candy on most phones. This seems very pointless."

Far from it. There's the case of actually recharging, stuff like that must be connection type agnostic in the long run. Also, if you are on the move with laptop and it's for your UMTS connection, that can be very handy. You know, in meetings, trains, hotels, ... whatever.

I've myself used that sort of approach at expos, bring internet connection with a phone that gets locked in a cabinet while the show machines using the connection are on the table. Magnificent. Just impossible to ever see whether the phone's battery will last.

Adam said...

Yeah this is definitely useful....crazy cool guys.


Grabbing bluetooth headset power would be useful (I don't use one yet as I don't want another battery to track :) )